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As of 28 February 2016, due to decline in my health and chronic illness

Sunday, February 3, 2013

HOUSE OF CORRUPTION by Erik Tavares_Review


House of CorruptionHouse of Corruption by Erik Tavares
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of House of Corruption by Erik Tavares
5 stars



“House of Corruption” is a complex and multithreaded tapestry, invoking the thought of a collaboration between Henry James and Edgar Rice Burroughs to rejuvenate “Dracula,” with all new characters and additional monstrous creatures. Author Erik Tavares has done his research, and the results are intriguing and riveting. An entirely new “thing that goes bump in the night” category arises here, a creature of Borneo and Malaysia, a sort of body thief, which consists of a head and spine, then taking on the form of actual individuals, in order to fool, to trick, and to attack and murder.
But this is not the only beastie in the cryptozoology of this novel: there is also lycanthropy, in the form of Reynard LaCroix and of Wilhelm Carlovec, a wealthy landowner of Borneo. Both men, who are actually lateral relations, suffer this disease because of their ancestor and his unholy pact. Both wish to overcome it, and one of them certainly will stop at nothing to find that cure. In the meanwhile, Reynard’s sister Lasha and Wilhelm’s daughter Kiria are in the crosshairs, subject to the whims of fate and the narcissistic self-centeredness of those determined to control.

I found this novel riveting and fast-paced, as much Supernatural thriller as mystery, hystery, and mythology.

Review of House of Corruption by Erik Tavares
5 stars

I reviewed an e-book copy provided by the author in return for my fair and impartial review.

“House of Corruption” is a complex and multi-threaded tapestry, invoking the thought of a collaboration between Henry James and Edgar Rice Burroughs to rejuvenate “Dracula,” with all new characters and additional monstrous creatures. Author Erik Tavares has done his research, and the results are intriguing and riveting. An entirely new “thing that goes bump in the night” category arises here, a creature of Borneo and Malaysia, a sort of body thief, which consists of a head and spine, then taking on the form of actual individuals, in order to fool, to trick, and to attack and murder.

But this is not the only beastie in the cryptozoology of this novel: there is also lycanthropy, in the form of Reynard LaCroix and of Wilhelm Carlovec, a wealthy landowner of Borneo. Both men, who are actually lateral relations, suffer this disease because of their ancestor and his unholy pact. Both wish to overcome it, and one of them certainly will stop at nothing to find that cure. In the meanwhile, Reynard’s sister Lasha and Wilhelm’s daughter Kiria are in the crosshairs, subject to the whims of fate and the narcissistic self-centeredness of those determined to control.

I found this novel riveting and fast-paced, as much Supernatural thriller as mystery, hystery, and mythology.




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